Six Fells on Super Saturday – Brae Fell, Great Sca Fell, Knott, Great Cock Up, Meal Fell and Longlands Fell

This was a delightful six fell extravaganza to start our Cumbrian holiday. We parked on the roadside, next to a gate near to Longlands Beck in Uldale. It’s worth getting up early because there is limited parking available; about four or five spaces if cars are parked considerately, with space for about three more the other side of the road. We arrived before 8 o’clock and by the time we had donned walking boots and gathered clothing, the area was full. The roads are narrow and unsuitable for verge parking.

This was a very safe walk with no steep drops or edges, instead we had long grassy slopes. The weather was being kind to us and by now the sun was shining.

Brae Fell Summit Cairn

The other half promised to keep out of sight whilst I took a photo of the summit cairn.

I clearly didn’t specify that he should keep his hat attached to his head during the process.

We ticked off the first Wainwright of the day, indeed of 2021, and trotted on to the next, scaling Little Sca Fell on the way. I have seen this listed both as a double summit with its neighbour, Great Sca, and as not counting as a Wainwright at all; take your pick!

The following photo wasn’t really intended to be an arty shot; another couple of walkers passed us just as we arrived at the summit and decided to sit on the cairn to have an early lunch. I’m not sure what the etiquette is surrounding such matters but being a bit of a wimp, I didn’t ask them if they would mind moving for a moment. I cut them out as you can see… or rather, not see?

Two Wainwrights down, four to go.

Great Sca Fell – is a pleasant unassuming summit. It is the highest of the Uldale Fells but hardly compares to others of similar name, Scafell and Scafell Pike.

With a stiffish breeze we walked towards our next goal, Knott. It was quite dry underfoot and an easy ascent to the summit cairn.

Underwhelmed by the top of Knott but happy to have bagged another fell. Three down; three to go! Next we headed for Great Cock Up via Burn Tod which afforded a wonderful view of Trusmadoor Valley.

I’m grateful to a Google search for the following meaning of Great Cock Up; the name originates from Olde English and is a combination of cocc meaning woodcock or black grouse and hop, meaning a secluded valley. So the literal translation is; ‘fell above a secluded valley where woodcock or black grouse are found.’ Despite this information, it still makes my (adult) children giggle.

This is the summit of Meal Fell. Slightly more impressive than Knott but the bar had been set pretty low. Getting slightly tired and irritated that we had to again tackle Little Sca Fell on our way to our final destination, Longlands Fell.

Our final fell of the day afforded nice views across the surrounding area, with the Solway Firth and the Galloway hills to the north and Skiddaw and the Whinlater forest area to the south. Longlands has the distinction of being the most northerly fell in the Lake District.

This circular walk took about seven hours of gentle rambling with several rests for refreshment and view-admiring. The climbs were all easy to moderate with some lovely flora to discover along the way. Later in the year, when the heather is in flower, I suspect the walk would be even better.

Join me next time for a pleasant wander up the slopes of Binsey, dodging the showers.

About Julie Haiselden

Between 1999-2019, I worked in the NHS and am now a Church of England verger and National Trust room guide. I've written three published novels and am an amateur blogger. As well as being a school alumna, I occasionally tread the boards. I enjoy rambling and taking photos. Since 2016, I've been part of the reviewing team at Whispering Stories.
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